Resources for teachers

Scratch resources

Below you'll find lesson plans, teacher guides and even some flash cards that can be used in coding lessons

 

Introduction to algorithms

Algorithms are a series of intructions, laid out in the right order, designed to complete a task or solve a problem. Use this simple lesson plan and accompanying guide to introduce the basics of algorithms. Ideal for pupils and teachers who are just starting out with computing and a great first step to understanding how computers work.
 

Introduction to conditionals

Conditional statements are all around us in everyday life and in computing. Use everyday examples to bring conditionals to life and get the class moving with an offline activity before creating a Rock, Paper, Scissors game using Scratch.

Introduction to loops

Creating clear and simple code makes fixing, or debugging, your code much easier and using loops to simplify your instructions is a great way to start writing efficient code. In this lesson get the class moving as they learn about loops through dance before moving on to create a drawing project using loops in Scratch.

Introduction to variables

In a program, data values can be constant or variable. If data values are variable they can be changed by the program and the user, for example, when the user is asked a question like their age. Variables may change during program execution.

A-maze-ing lesson plan

The lesson will introduce basic computational thinking and programming concepts by asking the class to create a maze game. Your pupils will start with an offline activity, and then go on to code their mazes in Scratch.
 

Introduction to Scratch

The purpose of this activity is to introduce Scratch for the first time to your class and to introduce some key computing vocabulary.

Using music

Lots of current music is made with computers, from pop songs to adverts, and everything in between. Your class can start to discover their own musical talents within Scratch. Use this guide to get to grips with the basics before introducing music coding into your lessons.

Using text to speech

Scratch alllows you to access external systems and devices through the extensions feature. One of the extensions you can access is the text to speech blocks. This will enable your class to make their projects talk. Use this simple guide to learn the basics before introducing this in to your lessons.

Using video sensing

Most current devices will have an integrated webcam and you can use this in your programming to become part of the game. Use this introduction to learn the basics of video sensing so you can challenge your class to use it in their projects.

Coding block flash cards

We've pulled together some of the main coding blocks for you to use in your offline coding sessions. These flash cards can be used to build programs and algorithms without the need for a computer.

Scratch editor screen

A basic screenshot of the Scratch editor which can be used to reference different parts of the coding screen and help you and your class become more familiar with how it works.

Micro:bit resources

Below you'll find lesson plans, teacher guides and even some flash cards that can be used in coding lessons

 

Introduction to conditionals

Conditional statements are all around us in everyday life and in computing. Use everyday examples to bring conditionals to life and get the class moving with an offline activity before creating a Rock, Paper, Scissors game using the micro:bit.

Introduction to loops

Creating clear and simple code makes fixing, or debugging, your code much easier and using loops to simplify your instructions is a great way to start writing efficient code. In this lesson get the class moving as they learn about loops through dance before moving on to create a simple game using loops and your micro:bit.

Introduction to variables

In a program, data values can be constant or variable. If data values are variable they can be changed by the program and the user, for example, when the user is asked a question like their age. Variables may change during program execution. In this lesson use variables to track the score in the project using inputs on the micro:bit

Introduction to Micro:bit

The BBC Micro:bit is an external device designed to introduce children to the basics of coding through physical computing. It's a great way to help your class understand the relationship between code and the devices it controls. Use this lesson to introduce the micro:bit and help your class get started with physical computing.

Using radio function

One of the Micro:bit's features allows the devices to communicate with each other through radio signals. Use these resources to introduce this function to the class and challenge them to find creative ways of using the radio.

Using the accelerometer

Lots of modern devices are able to tell what position they are in using built in accelerometers to measure their precise orientation. The Micro:bit's accelerometer can be used in the same way so you can use it as a controller or a sensor to start or interrupt your program. Use these resources to help your class learn the basics of how to use the accelerometer.

Downloading your code

Use this guide to get to grips with downloading your code from the micro:bit website to your device, before introducing micro:bits into your classroom.

What is the Micro:bit

Use this handout to show your class the different features of the micro:bit and where they are on the device.

Coding block flash cards

We've pulled together some of the main coding blocks for you to use in your offline coding sessions. These flash cards can be used to build programs and algorithms without the need for a computer.

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